gender

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Drama Queers  by Karen X. Tulchinsky
Drama Queers

Drama Queers

Ever since Ellen was cancelled, we have been starving for a TV show featuring a loud, proud, leaping lesbian. While Ellen Morgan the character didn’t survive, Ellen Degeneres has.

“Less evil and more glamour for daytime,” is what she promised of her new television talk show. Dressed in tailored suits, open collar and white runners, Degeneres exudes lesbian on her talk show. But it doesn’t deal with queer issues.

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Indigos Shine Light on Politics, Gay Marriage and Making Music  by Cindy Filipenko
Indigos Shine Light on Politics, Gay Marriage and Making Music

Indigos Shine Light on Politics, Gay Marriage and Making Music

It’s a typical muggy July afternoon in Vancouver. Inside the Commodore Ballroom—a relic from the ’20s restored to its art deco splendour five years ago—the Indigo Girls’ sound check is dragging.

Amy Ray, the dark-haired Indigo Girl known for her gravelly vocals and edgier songwriting style, is a little frustrated as she runs through the evening’s set list and corrects the levels for the duo’s plethora of stringed instruments.

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Flying High with Anne-Marie MacDonald  by Sara Cassidy
Flying High with Anne-Marie MacDonald

Flying High with Anne-Marie MacDonald

Ann-Marie MacDonald's second novel, The Way the Crow Flies (Random House of Canada, 2003), follows her award-winning Fall On Your Knees, a first novel that sold more than 300,000 copies in Canada and was selected for the Oprah Book-of-the-Month Club.

MacDonald is also a playwright and actor, and the current host of CBC-TV's Life and Times. She spoke with Sara Cassidy in September, over the phone from her "roundy Edwardian" home in Toronto, which she shares with her spouse, Alisa Palmer, and their infant daughter.

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Margaret Atwood Asks: Is This The Path We Want To Be On? Margaret Atwood  by Irene D'Souza
Margaret Atwood Asks: Is This The Path We Want To Be On? Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood Asks: Is This The Path We Want To Be On? Margaret Atwood

In this feature interview from Herizons arachives from Spring 2004, contributor Irene D'Souza spoke to Margaret Atwood about her childhood, her prescient gifts and her research into the trajectory that marks women's progress.

Herizons: What arouses your interest in reading?

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The Charter of Rights and Freedoms 20 Years Later  by Debra Parkes and Sara Lugtig
The Charter of Rights and Freedoms 20 Years Later

The Charter of Rights and Freedoms 20 Years Later

The federal government wants you to mark April 17, 2002 on your calendar. On that day, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms will turn 20. There will be ceremonies on Parliament Hill, academic conferences and media retrospectives commemorating this milestone in Canada's constitutional history.

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Will Women Save the Earth?  by Leigh Felesky
Will Women Save the Earth?

Will Women Save the Earth?

Sunlight twinkles on the water as waves cover the rocks, then recede, and then engulf them again. The light breeze is fresh and the day welcoming. Surroundings are resort-like, with beaches, green playgrounds and tiny, ivy-covered houses.

"Open?" I inquire. "Yes, the water is considered safe to swim in," explains my born-and-raised-in-Toronto companion. "I wouldn't go in there though."

Still, many barefoot and water-winged children laugh and play at one end of the beach.

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The Rise of Hipster Sexism  by Meghan Murphy
The Rise of Hipster Sexism

The Rise of Hipster Sexism

Describing the hipster is something you aren’t supposed to do. The mere mention of the fact that there are hipsters outs you as not being one.

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Ethical Pornography  by Tina Vasquez
Ethical Pornography

Ethical Pornography

It’s April 2011, and in the dark of a very small room about 70 people are watching porn together.

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Women's Studies: Is it Time to Change Course?  by Renee Bondy
Women's Studies: Is it Time to Change Course?

Women's Studies: Is it Time to Change Course?

It’s been four decades since the first women’s studies courses were offered in Canada, and the discipline seems to be hitting its stride. The first credit course in women’s studies was offered at the University of Toronto in 1970, and the first degree-granting program was at the University of British Columbia in 1971, a year after San Diego University established the first women’s studies program in North America.

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Jane Rules: Reflections on Living and on Loving  by Joanne Bealy
Jane Rules: Reflections on Living and on Loving

Jane Rules: Reflections on Living and on Loving

Jane Rule was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, on March 28, 1931. After spending time in England, she moved to Canada in 1956 to teach at the University of British Columbia.

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