body image

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Why Mannequins Must Reflect Us  by Sharon Haywood
 Why Mannequins Must Reflect Us

Why Mannequins Must Reflect Us

Triggering women’s insecurity by selling us unattainable beauty has been the golden rule for the fashion industry, but common sense begs the question: Wouldn’t sales naturally increase if consumers actually had models—both real-life models and mannequins—that looked like their own bodies?

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The Lure of Bonnie Marin  by Shawna Dempsey
The Lure of Bonnie Marin

The Lure of Bonnie Marin

At 6 a.m., Bonnie Marin begins another day cooking over a hot grill. Breakfast orders pour in, but as always her mind is elsewhere. She daydreams of giant storks standing on wet floors.

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Rhymes With Cubic Pear  by Renee Bondy
Rhymes With Cubic Pear

Rhymes With Cubic Pear

Back in its heyday, I performed in a local production of Eve Ensler’s The Vagina Monologues. I performed the monologue called “Hair,” in which a woman tells her story of being pressured by her husband to shave her pubic hair. After shaving, she feels “puffy and exposed and like a little girl.” Her husband is turned on. After she refuses to keep shaving, he is unfaithful, they attend couples’ therapy and ultimately, they divorce.

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The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry  by Misha Warbanski
The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry

The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry

Take a look around your bathroom. The average North American woman uses 10 or more personal care products every day.

From toothpaste and soap to antiperspirant and moisturizer, personal care products are made from 10,500 chemical ingredients that are as much a part of our daily routine as sitting down to breakfast.

And like most things that happen before a mug of morning coffee, it’s easy not to think about them too much. But researchers and women’s health activists are sounding the alarm bell about the makeup of makeup.

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Tattoos More than Skin Deep  by Alexis Keinlen
Tattoos More than Skin Deep

Tattoos More than Skin Deep

When Patricia Roe was 46, her 20-year-old son, Adam, died while mountain climbing in Guatemala.

Several of Adam’s friends got tattoos to mark the loss of their friend. A few weeks later, Roe got the same design tattooed a few inches above her knee, while Adam’s father had the tattoo applied to his shoulder. The design is an impala—a type of deer—surrounded by a sun. The deer was an important symbol for Roe’s son, who loved speed, movement and freedom; he also loved the sun.

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Red Tent Revolution  by Jeanie Keogh
Red Tent Revolution

Red Tent Revolution

Twenty-two years ago, Madeleine Shaw (photo, left) struggled to find a solution to the uncomfortable bladder infections she experienced brought on by the o.b. tampons she was using.

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The Fight For Dignity: Women With Disabilities  by Sandhya Singh
The Fight For Dignity: Women With Disabilities

The Fight For Dignity: Women With Disabilities

In 2007, 19-year-old Ashley Smith died in federal custody at the Grand Valley Institution for Women in Kitchener, Ontario.

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The Rise of Hipster Sexism  by Meghan Murphy
The Rise of Hipster Sexism

The Rise of Hipster Sexism

Describing the hipster is something you aren’t supposed to do. The mere mention of the fact that there are hipsters outs you as not being one.

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Viva la Vulva  by Erica Lenti
Viva la Vulva

Viva la Vulva

The mirror has long been touted as a feminist symbol of liberation. For some women, it is a means of understanding identity, a path to empowerment, a vehicle for harnessing sexual awareness.

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(Archives 2001) Are Periods Passé?  by Kathleen O'Grady
(Archives 2001) Are Periods Passé?

(Archives 2001) Are Periods Passé?

The human body is rarely viewed holistically anymore. In an increasingly technocratic world, our bodies are portrayed as objects made up of transferable bits and pieces.

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