laws

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Pill Side Effects Hard to Swallow  by Brittany Shoot
Pill Side Effects Hard to Swallow

Pill Side Effects Hard to Swallow

When the first generation of birth control pills was approved for sale in 1960, “the pill,” as it came to be known, was heralded as a great liberator. At long last women could reliably control their fertility. After just two years on the market, more than a million women were incorporating the pill into their daily routine. Within five years, the pill had become the most popular form of birth control in North America.

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Domestic Problems  by Sandhya Singh
Domestic Problems

Domestic Problems

BY SANDHYA SINGH

“Here, in Canada, in the 21st century, we have a program that is clearly violating human rights.” So says Cecilia Diocson, executive director of the National Alliance of Philippine Women in Canada (NAPWC).

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Gender Outlaws  by Mandy van Deven
Gender Outlaws

Gender Outlaws

In the 15 years since Kate Bornstein’s groundbreaking
Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women and the Rest of Us
exposed the cracks in the construction of gender,
the world has seen some significant changes.

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Rwanda Genocide Victims Speak Out  by Sandra Ka Hon Chu and Anne-Marie de Brouwer
Rwanda Genocide Victims Speak Out

Rwanda Genocide Victims Speak Out

In the 100 days of genocide that ravaged the small Central African nation of Rwanda from April until July 1994, about one million Tutsi and Hutu people were killed, and an estimated 250,000 to 500,000 women and girls were raped.

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Shock Doc  by Susan G. Cole
Shock Doc

Shock Doc

Naomi Klein has a remedy for the injustices of neo-liberal policies. Read her new book and call your member of parliament in the morning. It’s not easy talking about the excesses of capitalism, even when you’ve got an army of facts to back you up and a reputation for having inspired an entire generation to take up activism against global capital’s greedy excesses.

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The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry  by Misha Warbanski
The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry

The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry

Take a look around your bathroom. The average North American woman uses 10 or more personal care products every day.

From toothpaste and soap to antiperspirant and moisturizer, personal care products are made from 10,500 chemical ingredients that are as much a part of our daily routine as sitting down to breakfast.

And like most things that happen before a mug of morning coffee, it’s easy not to think about them too much. But researchers and women’s health activists are sounding the alarm bell about the makeup of makeup.

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Are Women Human?  by Susan G. Cole
Are Women Human?

Are Women Human?

Over the past 25 years, Catharine MacKinnon has changed the face of feminist legal theory. A law professor at the University of Michigan, she is, as one reviewer notes, “a famously polarizing figure.”

She pioneered the legal claim for sexual harassment as a form of sex discrimination, and her belief that pornography violates women’s civil rights influenced Canada’s redefinition of obscenity law from sexual explicitness to a harm-based approach a decade ago.

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Tanks R Us: Sarah Beck On The Fine Art Of Self Defence  by Roewan Crowe
Tanks R Us: Sarah Beck On The Fine Art Of Self Defence

Tanks R Us: Sarah Beck On The Fine Art Of Self Defence

Sarah Beck is a cultural activist. The Saskatchewan-based artist makes crystal-clear connections between themes of consumerism, the militarization of daily life and the mass marketing of armaments.

Beck’s latest project is entitled “Öde,” a Swedish word meaning both waste and fate. This multimedia project consists of several elements, including a website, a 32-page full-colour mail-order catalogue and an actual life-size tank.

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Indigos Shine Light on Politics, Gay Marriage and Making Music  by Cindy Filipenko
Indigos Shine Light on Politics, Gay Marriage and Making Music

Indigos Shine Light on Politics, Gay Marriage and Making Music

It’s a typical muggy July afternoon in Vancouver. Inside the Commodore Ballroom—a relic from the ’20s restored to its art deco splendour five years ago—the Indigo Girls’ sound check is dragging.

Amy Ray, the dark-haired Indigo Girl known for her gravelly vocals and edgier songwriting style, is a little frustrated as she runs through the evening’s set list and corrects the levels for the duo’s plethora of stringed instruments.

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How to Save the World in Your Spare Time  by Kate Heartfield
How to Save the World in Your Spare Time

How to Save the World in Your Spare Time

Elizabeth May is a tireless environmental activist and feminist. As executive director of the Sierra Club of Canada (now EcoJustice), she is in a unique situation to influence public policy. She held a public hunger strike on Parliament Hill to get Ottawa’s attention on the eco-disaster the Sydney tar ponds.

A lawyer by trade, May is author of At the Cutting Edge, a Canadian primer on the environmental impact of current forestry practices, and of a lengthy essay called “How to be an Activist” . Herizons caught up with May in Ottawa.

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